The Music Academy in Rockford http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com Wed, 19 Jul 2017 16:24:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.5 Video Inspiration for Parents http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/video-inspiration-for-parents/ Tue, 15 Sep 2015 21:04:03 +0000 http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/?p=1406 Further your Suzuki education….go to suzukiassociaton.org/parents-as-partners to view current parent education materials published by the SAA – Suzuki Association of the Americas.

]]>
Parents as Partners at The Music Academy http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/parents-as-partners-at-the-music-academy/ Thu, 10 Sep 2015 19:33:11 +0000 http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/?p=1370 Rachel-Handlin“What it Takes to Work”

an interview with Rachel Handlin, Artist Faculty Member

 

]]>
What Has Art Got To Do With It? http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/what-has-art-got-to-do-with-it/ Wed, 26 Aug 2015 21:16:38 +0000 http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/?p=1367 R&B legend Tina Turner (an artist who turned 76 last fall), asks in song, “What’s art go to do with it?” (In this case, “It” refers to aging.) The answer? Everything!

Artists, who work in community settings, including those who work with older adults, inevitably find that art-making offers therapeutic benefits to those who engage in it. In describing this, choreographer and MacArthur Fellow Liz Lerman said:
Sometimes art achieves what therapy, medicine, or the best care of health professionals cannot. Sometimes art even achieves something that’s beyond the best intentions of the artist. These moments can feel like little miracles when they happen, but they are usually instances of art functioning as it normally does: inspiring motivation, engaging parts of people’s bodies or brains that they haven’t been using, or allowing them to transcend their environments for a little while.

Artists like Liz Lerman believe that art can have its most beneficial effect when its intention is good art-making. They employ a rigorous artistic process, trust that individuals can produce meaningful work, and use that confidence as a lever to lift people above their circumstances or self-imposed limitations.

A study co-funded by the NEA, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), and other sponsors measured the impact of a professionally conducted choral program on the physical health, mental health, and social functioning of older adults. The intervention group reported better overall physical health, fewer doctor visits, less medication use, fewer instances of falls, and fewer health problems in relation to the comparison group. Similarly, the comparison group had a significant decline in total number of activities, whereas the intervention group reported a trend toward increased activity. Cohen et al. (2006)
The intent of arts and aging programs is to accomplish one or more of the following outcome goals—all aimed at enhancing quality of life—while engaging older adults in arts-based programming:
• Older adults have a sense of control and feel empowered (i.e., mastery).
• Older adults are socially engaged.
• Older adults exercise their bodies and brains to ensure high physical and mental function.
• Older adults are healthy, with reduced risk factors for disease and disability.
• Older adults have a positive attitude and zest for life.
• Older adults express themselves creatively.
Research shows that these outcome goals are interrelated. Combined, they contribute to a positive quality of life for older adults.

Here is the big picture: People are living longer and healthier lives. Demographics are changing and by 2030 will shift to over 70 million people over the age of 65 and the number of people over 85 doubling.

The good news is that organizations like The Music Academy in Rockford are a part of a movement creating aging friendly cities that are “great places to grow and to grow old.” We recognize and celebrate that older people bring a lifetime of interest and experience. We recognize they have great interest in returning to or starting new arts involvement. The arts are not “crafts for seniors”. How do we make our community better at providing for mental, emotional and physical health by extending or participating in arts education? Creativity allows us to re-imagine the second half of life in ways that are richer and more purposeful. Creativity allows for personal and social renewal. As our culture witnesses dramatic changes in attitudes related to aging, community capabilities and sustainability, we are poised with expertise and leadership in this field. Encore, our creative aging curriculum, was developed collaboratively with the National Council for Creative Aging (NCCA). Our teaching artists have undergone training and are certified by NCCA. As an established provider of community-based arts and learning programs, now celebrating our first 30 years, The Music Academy will continue to unlock the creative potential of participants and increase the health and vitality of individuals and community.

John Feather, CEO of Grantmakers in Aging says: ”Now is the time to be part of the process, part of the solution: the beyond bingo generation is here.” We at The Music Academy have developed music, movement and integrated arts curriculum that is of high-quality, comprehensive and affordable. We begin September 14 to deliver that curriculum at Lincolnshire Place in Loves Park. We look forward to expanding this program and offering best practice arts education for aging populations throughout our community.

As Gene Cohen says, “Creativity is chocolate for the brain.” Let’s get creative and make our community better at caring for our ever increasing aging population! It could be as addictive as chocolate!

The Music Academy is a not-for-profit community school of music dedicated to providing high quality, affordable instruction and performance opportunities to Academy students, regardless of age or ability. Its mission is to inspire a life-long love of music and the arts in its students. The Music Academy is celebrating 30 years. For more information about Encore, The Music Academy’s creative aging curriculum, or the Academy, call 815.986.0037 or go to www.MusicAcademyInRockford.com.

]]>
The Rockford Files http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/the-rockford-files/ Tue, 03 Feb 2015 21:27:08 +0000 http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/?p=1199 Paul Arco talks with Marti Frantz, executive director of The Music Academy in Rockford. During the interview, she talks about the history of this non-profit organization; the impact music can have on young people and ways local residents can get involved with The Music Academy.

Listen to the Podcast below:

]]>
What to do with fingers http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/what-to-do-with-fingers/ Thu, 11 Dec 2014 16:32:06 +0000 http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/?p=1163 “There are spaces between our fingers so that another person’s fingers can fill them in.”  Unknown

“In my world, there are also spaces between fingers so we can make another kind of love – music.”  Marti

]]>
About Parenting http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/about-parenting/ Tue, 04 Nov 2014 23:00:07 +0000 http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/?p=1117 Nurturing  Parents: Thoughts from Dr. Suzuki

“The fate of the child is in the  hands of his parents.”

“It is necessary to be concerned about the importance of educating really beautiful human spirit.”

“Children learn to smile from their parents.”

“Everything depends upon you.”

“What does not exist in the environment will not develop in the child.  By no means only words or music, but everything, good or bad is absorbed by the child.”

“Creating desire in your child’s heart is the parent’s duty.”

“Don’t hurry, don’t rest. Without stopping, without haste, carefully taking one step at a time will surely get you there.”

“Parents who recognize their child’s potential  ability are good parents.”

“It is your duty to raise your child to become a noble human being.”

“Wrong education and upbringing produces ugly personalities, where as a fine upbringing and good education will bring forth superior sense and feeling, as well as nobility and purity of mind.”

Compiled by Marylou Roberts,

Suzuki Guitar Teacher, Ann Arbor, Michigan

 

]]>
Catherine McMichael’s “Coronado” http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/coronado/ Tue, 30 Sep 2014 01:28:45 +0000 http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/?p=1049 Catherine McMichael’s “Coronado” composed for The Music Academy in Rockford on the occasion of the Coronado Theatre’s 80th birthday and performed by Music Academy students on the Coronado stage.

]]>
Music Academy Wish List for 2014-15 http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/music-academy-wish-list-for-2014-15/ Wed, 17 Sep 2014 21:22:37 +0000 http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/?p=1036  

 

The Music Academy Wish List

2014-15 Wish List

 

 

Supplies

Duplicating paper – $35 per ream/box

Laminating pouches – $28 per package

Music folders (25 per ensemble at ~$2.00 each = $50/ensemble)

Erasable marking pens (6 reading/ theory classes, average class size of 25) $35

A desktop computer – new ~$700. Used (but newer than oursJ) could work.

A larger monitor for Marti’s office – DONE!!

 

New Musical Scores

String Orchestra Scores ~$50 to $60 each.

 

Student scholarships/financial aid and Professional Development Fund   

Awards range from $300 per student to $1300 depending upon family income, number of siblings enrolled in program, commitment to the work and the school.

Total awards given annually = $15,000.

 

Physical Plant

Paint for exterior trim on building, especially south side. Rough estimate is $1,000.

Dollies for grand pianos at ~ $300 each. We could use three.

Cover for the Weber grand piano

Moving of Yamaha “Eric Dean” grand piano to the auditorium for dedication celebration – $300   DONE!!

Air conditioning for auditorium – $10,000 for materials. (Labor for installation has been donated.)  Project to take place in summer 2015.

A gently used refrigerator for Loreen’s kitchen, smallish in size.  We are on last legs with a screeching fan in the freezer in the existing 1970’s model.

 

Endowment Fund

The Music Academy aspires to ensure our future! An endowment would help!

]]>
Why a Music Education or How to Become Successsful http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/why-a-music-education-or-how-to-become-successsful/ Wed, 10 Sep 2014 22:09:31 +0000 http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/?p=1029 Erich Fromm once said, “Man’s main task in life is to give birth to himself.” Why should you give the gift of music and music education to your child?  Because you want them to have the tools to “give birth to themselves.”

What parents of music students give their child is the time to practice developing  the  tools to “give birth to themselves.”  What they become as adults may or may not have a thing to do with music. It does have to do with developing  what Dr. Shinichi Suzuki called the “sensitivity, discipline and endurance that ultimately produces a beautiful heart”  enabling success in life.

Look around at the children and families of The Music Academy.  They are interesting and successful people engaged in many walks of life.  Is it by accident that we are an extraordinary community?  I think not.  Instead I prefer to believe that  each member of our community has found (or is finding) a way “to give birth to themselves” and creating pathways to success.

Do pause to applaud yourself for the wise choice of gift you give when you invest in music education. Know that the time you invest in this education (music is “again and again and over and over, year in and year out”)  is also precious.  You give your child the opportunity  to “give birth to” themselves and time to blossom in this remarkable community we call The Music Academy.

]]>
Why Make Music? Or, How to Become Successful http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/why-make-music-or-how-to-become-successful/ Wed, 10 Sep 2014 16:45:05 +0000 http://www.musicacademyinrockford.com/?p=1026 Erich Fromm once said, “Man’s main task in life is to give birth to himself.” Why should you give the gift of music and music education to your child?  Because you want them to have the tools to “give birth to themselves.”

What parents of music students give their child is the time to practice developing  the  tools to “give birth to themselves.”  What they become as adults may or may not have a thing to do with music. It does have to do with developing  what Dr. Shinichi Suzuki called the “sensitivity, discipline and endurance that ultimately produces a beautiful heart”  enabling success in life.

Look around at the children and families of The Music Academy.  They are interesting and successful people engaged in many walks of life.  Is it by accident that we are an extraordinary community?  I think not.  Instead I prefer to believe that  each member of our community has found (or is finding) a way “to give birth to themselves” and creating pathways to success.

Do pause to applaud yourself for the wise choice of gift you give when you invest in music education. Know that the time you invest in this education (music is “again and again and over and over, year in and year out”)  is also precious.  You give your child the opportunity  to “give birth to” themselves and time to blossom in this remarkable community we call The Music Academy.

]]>